Lamb – Roasting Joints

Joints of lamb can be prepared so that they are served on or off the bone. It is usually preferable to cook joints on the bone so that more flavour infuses with the meat during cooking. However bone in joints can be harder to carve and so many people prefer to cook them without the bone (this is OK by the way and nobody will think less of you if you do cook boneless joints!!) Starting from the front of the lamb and working back we have:

Shoulder of Lamb

Most often served boned and rolled this is the more humble lamb roast and is often deemed to be less tender. It is however full of flavour and whilst suited for slow cooking it does make an excellent carving roast.

Rack of Lamb

The rack of lamb is cut from the best end of the lamb and is a bone in joint. Racks are French trimmed to expose the rib bones and to remove excess fat making it an impressive looking joint.

Saddle of Lamb

A joint that is usually boned and rolled from the double loin end so that it also contains the fillet. However it can be left on the bone and although not a common way of cooking saddle, it is an impressive looking joint and there is no reason not to cook it in this fashion.

Gigot

Most commonly cooked and carved on the bone, this is probably the archetypal family lamb roast. It is becoming more common for this joint to be served boned or partially boned and rolled and is therefore easier to carve.

Lamb Joint Cooking Times

Minutes / pound
Minutes / kilo
Gas Mark
°C
°F
Medium25/lb + 25 mins
55/kg + 25 mins
Gas 4-5
180 °C
350 °F
Rest for up to 30
minutes after cooking
Well Done30/lb + 30 mins
65/kg + 30mins
Gas 4-5
180 °C
350 °F
Rest for up to 30
minutes after cooking